Monthly Archives: January 2016

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DMacA_3 is a CMAJ Associate Editor and a professor of primary care in Northern Ireland, UK

 

Reading a recent of the achievements and challenges to academic general practice in the UK, and a for increased capacity in clinical academic general practice, I began to wonder.... How might we design general practice research for the future, what direction should a department of general practice take, and where does general practice fit into the future of clinical research? As an intellectual exercise, I allowed myself to think the unthinkable. And, for a general practice academic, brought up in family medicine and immersed in the traditions of personal primary and continuing care, this felt like heresy. At the very least, however, perhaps we should begin to think creatively about the future. What do you think?

It is difficult to see a future for academic general practice. ...continue reading

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 cragg_CMAJblog_photoJacquelyn Cragg is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and University of British Columbia.

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John Kramer is an Assistant Professor at the University of British Columbia

 

In January and February of this year, health researchers across Canada are ramping up grant writing ahead of the 2016 Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Project Scheme deadline. As with all grant applications, these researchers (applicants and co-applicants, and their respective trainees) will be meticulously preparing their curriculum vitaes (CVs), in order to showcase the success of their research activities. A cornerstone for federal governmental granting dollars since 2002, this wave of self-publicity will pivotally involve preparing a (CCV). ...continue reading

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Mary KoziolMary Koziol
McGill University
Class of 2018

I notice him several times as I hurry past, wondering to myself what his story could be. He’s quite an old man, at least in his 80s. From a distance, I see two bulging black eyes, his face a mess of dripping blood. He’s observing the hustle of the ER with the expression of an accidental spectator at a cricket match: curious, but evidently a bit lost. I read the chart as I stride towards him: tripped and fell forward onto his face. Lives alone in a retirement home. On blood thinners.

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TH - PHSPTrevor Hancock is a professor and senior scholar at the University of Victoria’s

 

Canada’s Health Ministers met in Vancouver this week. All indications are that their talks were a lot about health care and funding, and very little about health itself. After all, let’s face it, our ‘health’ ministries are really ministries of illness care, there to manage a (very expensive) illness care system. And that system is there mainly to pick up the pieces once we become sick or injured or ‘unwell’ – not so much diseased as ‘dis-eased’.

Now don’t get me wrong, when the time comes when I need it, I would like a good illness care system there to look after me and – hopefully – restore me to pretty good health. And when I am too frail to manage, I hope it will be there to care for me with kindness and compassion. But wouldn’t it be better if I didn’t need it – or didn’t need it very much? ...continue reading

 

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Photo by: Photawa/iStock

Harold Fireman is a retired physician. He is 96 years old and retired aged 88

 

Medical doctors, in a long career, encounter many interesting, unforgettable events. Strangely, my most elite experience came almost immediately after I graduated from the University of Toronto Medical Faculty in March 1942. World War II was at its peak, since Hitler's army had over-run Europe in 1939 but Queen Wilhelmina of Holland had escaped to England with her family and some Dutch officials, joining the Allies in hopes of eventually reconquering Europe. England, however, was a short distance from mainland Europe hence the German Luftwaffe made frequent bombing trips to England, mostly to London. Queen Wilhelmina felt she had to remain as the iconic Dutch figure, at the Allied hub in London, but wisely decided that her family would be safer in Canada. ...continue reading

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DMacA_3 is a CMAJ Associate Editor and a professor of primary care in Northern Ireland, UK

 

Could cancer simply be due to bad luck rather than environmental factors, risky behaviour or bad habits? In recent weeks, media attention focused on a scientific discussion on the risk of cancer based on papers published in Science and Nature. While the discussion itself is fascinating, isn’t it interesting that this debate took place across mainstream scientific publications rather than in established medical journals. Perhaps medicine is already convinced by the epidemiology or, maybe medical journals are less open to such debate. This is the story: ...continue reading

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JC_ChirgwinJuan Carlos Chirgwin is a family doctor working at CLSC Park Extension health facility in Montreal, Canada

 

Now that “Canada is back” and “sunny ways” are on the horizon, as Prime Minister Trudeau has said, we in the medical community should also look to the light. True, we made progressive strides in the last half century, producing today’s medical body, which is more ethnically and gender diverse. Medicine has opened up new fields and models of thinking, notably in global health and social determinants of health. Physicians have been spokespersons for worthy causes for decades, but is our medical community paying sufficient attention to the nuclear risk?

An article by Dr. Helfand and Dr. Sidel, “” appeared ...continue reading

TH - PHSPTrevor Hancock is a professor and senior scholar at the University of Victoria’s

 

Canada’s health ministers will meet in Vancouver on January 20, 2016. It is good to know we have a federal government that will engage with the provinces on health care. Let’s hope they will engage on health, not just health care.

Forty years ago, the Trudeau government of the day produced the fabled . It became the first government in modern times to acknowledge that further improvements in the health of the population would not come primarily from more health care. ...continue reading

Amanda FormosaAmanda Formosa
University of Toronto
Class of 2016

At the beginning of third year medical school, I envisioned the next twelve months as an immersion in the clinical world, with the personal expectation of learning everything. I never anticipated the subtleties of the patient-doctor dynamic that I would identify. One lesson I learned was about the difference between patient-doctor and patient-student communication – an exceedingly common yet rarely-spoken-about disparity that teaches medical personnel about how different approaches to history gathering can yield varied results in assessments. ...continue reading