Primary Care

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is a CMAJ Associate Editor and a professor of primary care in Northern Ireland, UK.

 

The in the United Kingdom and Ireland, the Society of Academic Primary Care (SAPC) meeting, was hosted by the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland.

, a long time friend and colleague, gave the opening keynote address, guiding us through the evolving patterns of morbidity and mortality in cardiovascular disease ...continue reading

is a CMAJ Associate Editor and a professor of primary care in Northern Ireland, UK.

 

The following brief video summary of the recent International Colloquium on Clinical Academic Careers in Primary Care highlights enthusiasm, strong collaboration and funding as key facilitators for robust primary care research. ...continue reading

is Director at the National Institutes of Health Research (NIHR) School for Primary Care Research (SPCR), and Professor of Primary Care Health Sciences at Oxford University in England

 

Structured academic training opportunities for clinical and non-clinical scientists is seen as a key deliverable by UK research funders. Each of the big national funders (MRC, Wellcome, NIHR) therefore have schemes for early career applicants on pre-doctoral, post-doctoral, more established researcher grades, and even at professorial level. There are differences between funders in what the schemes expect and what they offer (such as what topics are accepted, how long the fellowship operates for, what element of clinical work can be added, whether research funds are also provided, etc). However, there are broad similarities ...continue reading

Fennell Photography 2014

Dr A. Montesanti,           Fennell Photography 2014

Annalisa Montesanti is a Programme Manager at Ireland's Health Research Board

 

Health research, and its knowledge application and translation towards more tangible impacts, requires the talent, expertise and ingenuity of a wide range of people. The challenge for a health research funding organisation is how to efficiently build research capacity in a collaborative manner across clinicians and other health professionals, scientists, social scientists, epidemiologists, health economists, statisticians, engineers, policy-makers, decision-makers, patient groups, public groups, and others. ...continue reading

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Robyn Tamblyn_cropped is Scientific Director at the , Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), and Professor in the Department of Medicine and Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics at McGill University's Faculty of Medicine, in Canada

 

In our modern world, ‘next gen’ releases of technological devices and apps seem to come along before we have even figured out the previous version. We have a new generation of communication, new systems of tracking information and a new level of data availability.

Our healthcare system, accessed by millions of Canadians each day, has also entered a new generation as it produces trillions of bits information that could be harnessed to understand the comparative effectiveness of different treatments, the causes of potentially avoidable adverse events, unnecessary costs and missed opportunities for prevention, and to improve patient experience. But to this point, we have not really been able to use this information to produce knowledge on . In order to do so we need a ‘next gen’ health system. ...continue reading

AHoweAmanda Howe is Professor of Primary Care at the University of East Anglia in Norwich, England, and President-Elect of the

 

I am heading for the explicitly international perspective of the in Dublin tomorrow, which is part of this year’s . I'll be commenting in my capacity as President-Elect of the World Organization of Family Doctors (). Let’s leave aside my sense of irony and grief that I shall be doing this as a little Englander whose country thinks it can manage alone – and will probably have to....I am writing this as a citizen of the world, where the professional networks of doctors, researchers, and scientists can span borders and bring fruitful ideas to deliver better care for our peoples. ...continue reading

ew photo is a Senior Clinical Research fellow in the Health Research Board (HRB) Centre for Primary Care Research at the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI) Medical school

 

This week, the Society of Academic Primary Care (SAPC) is being hosted by the Department of General Practice, of the RCSI, in Dublin. As part of the organising committee for the conference I am very much looking forward to welcoming primary care researchers from all over the world to Dublin to partake in what is sure to be a stimulating and diverse programme.  In parallel to the conference, a clinical academic career in Family Medicine/General Practice (GP) meeting will take place to share international experiences and best practice with attendees from Sweden, Canada, the United Kingdom (UK) and Ireland. In anticipation of this meeting, I will share some of my own experiences and reflections as a GP undertaking structured PhD training in Ireland ...continue reading

lindholm_LH_trekvartsfigur is Professor and Director at Umeå University, Sweden

 

In 2009, the Swedish Research Council () advertised funding for five research schools (SEK 15 million each, about CAD 2,5 million). One of these was in General Practice. All universities competed but received the grant for 2010-14/15, after having formed a network with Gothenburg and Linköping universities. ...continue reading

NormanWendyV is the CIHR and PHAC Chair in Family Planning Public Health Research, and Associate Professor in the at the University of British Columbia

 

As a career offering diverse experiences, challenge and intense satisfaction, academic family practice surely cannot be beat. Many of us may have begun our academic practice early in our career, particularly those of us who were biomedical clinicians-scientists. However, for me the journey to a full academic career, as maybe more typical for family practice clinician scientists, developed over several decades.

Although my early practice-only years in a , accessible only by ferry or float plane, came with long hours and difficult decisions ...continue reading

Fahey_150x240Tom Fahey is Professor of General Practice in The Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland and a general practitioner in Dublin, Ireland

 

In late 2015 I was fortunate to be awarded a   from the Ireland Canada University Foundation (). The purpose of this award is to enable academic exchange between Canada and Ireland. Earlier this year I visited the Universities of Ottawa, Toronto and British Columbia and also met with the editorial team of the CMAJ. In the latter part of my visit I met with , Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) and Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) Chair ...continue reading