Tag Archives: Canadian government

TH - PHSPTrevor Hancock is a professor and senior scholar at the University of Victoria’s

 

Canada’s health ministers will meet in Vancouver on January 20, 2016. It is good to know we have a federal government that will engage with the provinces on health care. Let’s hope they will engage on health, not just health care.

Forty years ago, the Trudeau government of the day produced the fabled . It became the first government in modern times to acknowledge that further improvements in the health of the population would not come primarily from more health care. ...continue reading

is Deputy Editor at CMAJ; he recently returned from the American Thoracic Society 2015 in Denver, Colorado

 

Denver has always presented a striking contrast of natural beauty with urban realism. The two most prominent expressions I saw of the latter are an increased presence of homeless persons and the pungent and almost inescapable aroma of marijuana, both regularly encountered when walking down the pedestrian mall at the heart of the city’s downtown. The two and illustrate one of perhaps many unanticipated consequences of the recent legalization of marijuana in the state of Colorado.

I can’t decide if this made the choice of Denver as host city for the world’s largest lung diseases conference, the , particularly appropriate or particularly ironic. ...continue reading

Michael Clark is an Assistant Professor at the Northern Ontario School of Medicine

 

I think it is time that pediatricians and other physicians who care for children weigh in on the subject of .  This young man, pushed by family into al-Qaeda as a 13 year old, clearly meets the United Nations definition of a child soldier.  A boy so young is not developmentally ready to understand the implications of ...continue reading

Dr. Matthew Stanbrook, deputy editor of CMAJ, interviews , family physician and VP of Medical Affairs and Health System Solutions at Women's College Hospital in Toronto (and she made headlines last year when she eloquently in front of the US Senate during the Obamacare debate).

Dr. Martin and co-authors (, , , ) say that implementing universal public coverage of prescription drugs in Canada would be estimated to reduce total spending by $7.2 billion while increasing government costs by only $1.0 billion. This economic modeling study shows that universal public drug coverage could be implemented without substantially increasing government spending.

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