Tag Archives: CFMS

Jonathan Oore is a medical student in the Class of 2019 at Dalhousie University

 

Artist’s Statement for Milgwija'sit Puoin An'stawe'g Wuguntew or Apprehensive about the future of the spirit-healer's fragile stone

This artist’s statement accompanies my artwork featured on the cover. Broadly, it is a comment on indigenous health.

Mi’kmaq art and craft is laden with straight lines, sometimes by necessity of the tools or materials used to produce them. The rays of the sun in the branching of a tree; the geodesics of a turtle’s shell within the modal phenomena of the ocean or tessellated through the moon; recursive, tortuous animal-in-animals; cross-hatched petroglyphs on (cylindrical) trees. A stark contrast between curved and straight is pitted and married over and over. The confluence and absence of the straightness, curvedness, and “curvilinearity” is the point—a point—the top of a wigwam, the poles of a canoe, the countless barbed tips of quillwork. ...continue reading

Medical Students, (Dalhousie University), Jackie Vanek (University of Ottawa), (Queen’s University) and (University of Manitoba), are the team responsible for

 

 

TEN. This is the percentage of Canadians who are .

NINETY-ONE. This is the   in favour of a Universal Pharmacare strategy for Canada.

SEVEN BILLION. This is the amount of Canadian dollars that on prescription drug expenditures every year.

The statistics speak for themselves. The evidence, published in countless editorials and reports across the country, is difficult to deny.

On average, on prescription drug coverage. Of these nations, Canada has the fastest rising drug costs. These costs are often shouldered by our patients due to the low proportion of public funding for pharmaceutical products. Our current system is fragmented and inefficient, leading to profound inequities with regards to who gets to fill their medication prescriptions and thus, who gets to access our health care system. ...continue reading

Maxime Billick, Jeremy Cygler, Gabriel Devlin and Bellal Jubran are all third year medical students at McGill University

 

We are four fresh and eager medical students just beginning clerkship, but we can already attest to the importance of blood in medicine. We use blood to bring back patients from the brink of death in the operating room. We use it to treat patients with sickle cell disease on the medical wards. We use it to advance scientific knowledge in the research lab. Yet the policies that govern how we collect donated blood remain woefully antiquated. ...continue reading