Tag Archives: football

Paul Dhillon is a Clinical Assistant Professor in Academic Family Medicine at the University of Saskatchewan

 

Twenty-two physicians from across Canada recently left their examination rooms and operating theaters behind for a unique opportunity to represent Canada internationally at the in Barcelona, Spain.

The championships have been occurring annually for 22 years with an associated medical sports and health symposium offered concurrently. This was to participate. Canada was represented from coast to coast with physicians from Halifax to Vancouver selected for the team (see a full list of players below).

We began the tournament in a difficult group that contained the eventual runners-up, Sweden, and the 4th place finishers Australia ...continue reading

Domhnall MacAuley is a CMAJ Associate Editor and a professor of primary care in Northern Ireland, UK, and recently in Edinburgh for the 2014

 

Why are the Jamaicans so dominant in world sprinting? And, it’s not just Jamaicans, but those of Jamaican origin representing other countries such as Canada and the UK. Is there a genetic component? , a world expert with access to the world’s largest biobank, found no unique genetic trait. Jamaicans’ believe that this dominance is from the eugenic effects of the slave trade - only the fittest and strongest survived ...continue reading

Its not just the football. Sports docs watch the World Cup medical stories with great interest—which players are injured, what happened and how they are managed. Luis Suárez, suddenly infamous, scored two goals, effectively eliminating England, just weeks after an arthroscopy. And, with the current controversy over concussion and possible long term chronic traumatic encephalopathy, we are especially aware of head injuries. , team doctors of the 32 finalist teams reported 125 injuries in 64 matches with 104 injuries during training. Most of these injuries were not serious and the incidence of match injuries was lower than in the three preceding World Cups. So far, this year looks even better. The World Cup only offers a short window on acute soccer injuries, however, and it may be more important to look at the long term sequelae and, in particular, if soccer might lead to long term osteoarthritis. There is some evidence that it does but we await the findings of , Osteoarthritis Risk of Professional Footballers, undertaken by the Arthritis Research UK Centre for Sport, Exercise and Osteoarthritis—a major UK and international collaboration. The World Cup is also likely to generate other tangential papers such as to how it might influence the number of ER admissions or .

Exercise in treating arthritis initially seemed counter intuitive. , now at University of Western Ontario, first brought this to my attention in a poster at a medical conference, and it led to his in 2000 asking if exercise was an effective treatment for osteoarthritis of the knee. At that time there were few sufficiently powered randomised controlled trials but, overall, the evidence seemed in favour. Last year, a similar showed overwhelming evidence in favour of exercise for lower limb osteoarthritis. This was a sequential meta analysis and, what was particularly important, was that there was sufficient evidence to show physical activity was beneficial as early as 2002. It can take a long time to change our minds and integrate evidence into practice.

Evidence in treating arthritis is not always what one might expect. Just a few weeks ago, and her colleagues published a high quality randomized controlled trial on . Patients had 10 treatments over 12 weeks comprising education and advice, manual therapy, home exercise, and gait aid if appropriate. There was, perhaps unexpectedly, no difference in pain or function compared with sham treatment. I cannot imagine that the findings of this study were welcomed by Kim’s physiotherapy colleagues. Its not just in football where the results can be surprising, unexpected and disappointing for the supporters.