Tag Archives: global health

Robbie Sparrow is a medical student in the Class of 2019 at Western University


For individuals facing deep personal struggles, the path to recovery is often daunting and overwhelming. Support from others who have overcome similar challenges can be extremely beneficial. For example, the best people to help heroin addicts are those who have fought to stay sober for two years, and women facing domestic abuse are best aided by women who have escaped it. Doctors who care for patients living through crises are often disadvantaged when trying to empathize with them because they themselves haven’t faced the same struggle. Difficult experiences throughout a physicians’ life can help them approach this ideal of empathy and improve the care they offer patients. ...continue reading

is the Executive Director of the (CHSL), and  publisher of magazine


The new Director General (DG) of the World Health Organization (WHO) will soon be elected. If the upcoming election does not effectively hold to account all candidates, especially the successful one, the WHO risks losing its influence as the leading global public health authority.

On May 23, 2017, for the first time in WHO’s history, all 194 Member States of its governing body, the World Health Assembly, will cast a vote for the new WHO DG at its annual meeting in Geneva. (Previously, the DG was selected by the WHO's 34-member Executive Board.)

But, public health challenges are too great to allow the vote to descend into geo-political horse-trading and unchallenged controversy-dodging in an environment where opportunities for public vetting are few.

The WHO DG is head of a global staff of 7,000 and chief global ambassador to national health ministries world-wide. The WHO’s prominence and the need for its leadership in global public health have long been greatest in low- and middle-income countries where national health systems suffer a relative lack of financial resources and specialized technical expertise.  But high-income countries draw on the WHO’s work, ranging from graded distillations of nutrition and alcohol research to annual advice about the best flu vaccine to administer globally.

The three candidates shortlisted for the position of DG have been persistently ambiguous about their stances on important governance issues. ...continue reading

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Dr Patrick O’Donnell is a Clinical Fellow at the University of Limerick and works on the . Last week he attended as the recipient of the 2015 WONCA Europe Montegut Scholarship


Nobody could have predicted the desperate state in Syria when the World Organization of National Colleges, Academies and Academic Associations of General Practitioners/Family Physicians (WONCA) Europe Conference for 2015 was awarded to the Turkish Family Medicine Organisation  (TAHUD) a few years ago. Few could also have predicted that Turkey would be at the very centre of a mass exodus of people not seen in Europe since the Second World War. According to the UNHCR as of September 2015 the country now finds itself providing refuge to an fleeing conflict and destitution. I have heard the current situation being described as a ‘stress test’ of the European values of solidarity and collegiality, ...continue reading

Dr. John Fletcher, editor-in-chief, gives you highlights of the . In this issue: ultrasound or near-infrared to guide peripheral IV catheterization in children, validation of a 1-hour rule-out rule-in algorithm for myocardial infarction, social media in medical education, global tobacco control, elder abuse, and more.

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Dr. Moneeza Walji, editorial fellow, interviews , founding and current director of the Centre for Global Health Research in Toronto. In their commentary published in CMAJ, Dr. Jha and colleagues say that slowing tobacco sales in the next decade will depend on strengthening its implementation by increasing excise tax and improving anti-tobacco legislation. ...continue reading

Moneeza Walji is the CMAJ Editorial Fellow 2014–2015

. Of those, 65% were in the developing world. Yet despite this large toll, the world still does not have a global body to coordinate cancer prevention and management efforts.

On Wednesday, March 25, the hosted the Symposium on Global Cancer Research, bringing together leaders to speak about issues at the intersection of global health and cancer. ...continue reading

is Deputy Editor at CMAJ


Today, February 27th 2015, marks the tenth anniversary of the coming into force of the (). To mark the historic treaty's first decade the WHO's Director-General, , gave in which she called the FCTC the 'single most powerful preventive instrument available to public health'. She wasn't exaggerating. I'll tell you why.

The FCTC was the first, and remains the only, legally binding multilateral agreement ratified by WHO member states. Most of WHO's directives are delivered with the all the authority of a global governance institution but with none of the legal teeth that multilateral trade agreements, for example, enjoy. ...continue reading

Baukje (Bo) Miedema is Professor and Director of Research at the Dalhousie University Family Medicine Teaching Unit and Adjunct Professor in the Sociology Department, University of New Brunswick

 “The constitution” of primary health internationally, as a core component of the structure of health, care can be traced back to the , even though its origins go much further back in time: 1941 in the Netherlands and 1948 in the United Kingdom. The Declaration states that governments have to be responsible for the health of their people. Primary health care is seen as an important vehicle to deliver health care to the population, and is defined as care that “addresses the main health problems in the community, providing promotive, preventative, curative and rehabilitative services accordingly.” The Declaration of Alma-Ata also states that by the year 2000 there should be “health for all.” ...continue reading

Silvina Mema MD MSc is a Senior Resident in Public Health and Preventive Medicine at the University of Calgary, Alberta



 Lynn McIntyre MD MHSc FRCPC is Professor in the Department of Community Health Sciences, and Research Coordinator for the Public Health and Preventive Medicine program, at the University of Calgary, Alberta


I am sitting on a balcony in Mwanza, Tanzania looking out on Lake Victoria. This is the second public health and preventive medicine residency elective I have done here.

Mwanza, Tanzania

My institution, , embraces and by covering some or all of residents’ travel expenses and facilitating contact with potential host institutions.

The Canadian Association of Interns and Residents supports global health electives as well and . Their guidelines state that Postgraduate Medical Education Offices should offer residents predeparture training to address health, safety and “ethical challenges”; to designate a contact person; and to provide clear expectations. I have been thinking about these "ethical challenges" in addition to how sending institutions define their own responsibilities, not only towards their residents, but with regard to host institutions. ...continue reading

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Giovanni Apráez ippolito is Professor of Public Health at School of Medicine, National University of Colombia and Adviser in Primary Care in Cauca Region, Colombia. Carlos Sarmiento Limas MD MPH is Head of Public Health at School of Medicine, National University of Colombia,  and ex-medical officer in Ministry of Health in Bogota-Colombia


Colombia pioneered primary health care (PHC) in the Latin American Region until the . There was then a crisis in PHC due to reform of the national Health system (by law 100 in 1993), which adopted a system based on the insurance model. This led to two decades of debate without any structural changes, and Colombia became the focus for and Health Organization models. During the past 60 years there was also a war in Colombia that appears to have ended during the current national government (2014-2018).

The international consensus is that health systems based on PHC have better results, lower costs, guarantee the right of health of individuals and communities, promote comprehensive care, promote health, and contribute to achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), among many other benefits. Primary care is organised according to the individual circumstances in each country () but, in our opinion, this structure must be predominantly public.

There is renewed interest in PHC in Columbia for several reasons ...continue reading