Tag Archives: medical education

Grace Zhang is a medical student in the Class of 2019 at Queen's University

 

 

 

[For my Grandmother]

we don’t talk much these days
(which is mostly my fault, I know)
but if we were on the phone
right now,
I’d tell you how
when we sat in lecture learning about ...continue reading

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Sarah Chauvin is a medical student in the Class of 2018 at the University of Toronto

 

Collateral. Collateral. Collateral. Three weeks in a psychiatric Emergency Department, and I have more than a mere appreciation for collateral: I’ve come to understand it as a key diagnostic investigation.

Toward the end of my weekend call shift, my young patient with severe alcohol use disorder and borderline personality disorder — who had been discharged the week prior with an addictions referral — was back in the ED for alcohol intoxication. Though I had been cautioned that the patient would likely return, I was disappointed to see her name back on the patient-tracking list. ...continue reading

Adriano MollicaAdriano Mollica
University of Toronto
Class of 2019

the crevices in my hands could never course deep enough
to hold all the life that has moved between your synapses

and yet, in the basement labs of my medical school
I am holding every part of who you were ...continue reading

Amanda FormosaAmanda Formosa
University of Toronto
Class of 2016

At the beginning of third year medical school, I envisioned the next twelve months as an immersion in the clinical world, with the personal expectation of learning everything. I never anticipated the subtleties of the patient-doctor dynamic that I would identify. One lesson I learned was about the difference between patient-doctor and patient-student communication – an exceedingly common yet rarely-spoken-about disparity that teaches medical personnel about how different approaches to history gathering can yield varied results in assessments. ...continue reading

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is a CMAJ Associate Editor and professor of primary care in Northern Ireland, UK

Speaking to your colleagues at your own , there is no hiding place. No longer the “expert” from abroad with dodgy ideas and a foreign accent, they know who you are! Invited to give some perspective as a medical journal editor, what did I say? First, I don’t have all the answers; some are certain to be wrong — perhaps all of them. But it’s the conversation that matters. See what you think: ...continue reading

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Abdullah Nasser is a medical student at the Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, in London, Ontario

 

The lecture hall slowly came to life. Notebooks in hand, the students filed in to take the front rows. They spoke in hushed tones, ready to put those notebooks to use at any minute. I have not seen a crowd of students so eager to start. But this was not your average university lecture. In fact, it was not a lecture at all. It was a premedical symposium intended to introduce them to medical schools and the application process.

 As the symposium got underway, the various steps of the application process were explained in true medical fashion — with an alphabet soup. You write your MCAT, and then start your OMSAS. If you don’t mind being an IMG, you might also consider filling out your AMCAS or UCAS, just in case. Be prepared to do your MMIs if you they call you in for an interview.

The students seemed unfazed. They know medicine is their true calling. “I’ve wanted to be a doctor ever since I was five,” one of them told me with a mixture of pride and determination.

That was until we got to the financial section. ...continue reading

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is a general practitioner in London, UK, and a NIHR In Practice Research Fellow at the Centre for Primary Care and Public Health, Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry

, a young doctor with cancer, recently wrote a book called ''. It's a book for doctors ‘to be better able to understand exactly what being the patient is really like …” Other medical writers have also been motivated by the shocking realisation that medical education and clinical practice had taught them so little about what it’s like to be a patient, the particular problems that doctors themselves have in coping with illness and the health risks associated with their profession; loss of identity, shame and stigma, the need to be treated as a person and an acute awareness of mistakes were common themes of narratives.

Inspired by their stories, I have been leading teaching seminars with medical students, GP trainees, GP trainers, GP retainers, medical humanities students and and learned a few more lessons along the way.

Doctors’ illness narratives have a particular power ...continue reading

Sarah Currie is a medical copy editor on CMAJ

The opposite of play is not work. It’s depression. — Brian Sutton-Smith

A little nonsense now and then is cherished by the wisest men.― Roald Dahl, Charlie & the Great Glass Elevator

Recess Rules

What happens when we play? What changes do we notice in our bodies? When we play a game with others, how do we experience those players? What physical or physiological responses to the actions or emotions involved do we notice? What is play? According to Jill  Vialet, author of the book '', play is like pornography: you know it when you see it. The dictionary includes words like “aimless” and “frivolous.” Bernard Suits described playing a game as a voluntary attempt to overcome unnecessary obstacles. But we shouldn’t be so dismissive of play and its benefits and rewards.

People who play are more trusting; they are better self-regulators and can resolve conflict more effectively. Groups who play together have healthier interactions ...continue reading

Lauren Vogel is a news editor on CMAJ

What separates a good idea from an amazing one? A TEDMED2014 session I live streamed Wednesday provided plenty of clues. Although the speakers came from widely diverse backgrounds, ranging from journalism to ocean swimming, three strong threads – simplicity, specificity and daring – bound together the lessons they shared.

“Flat Out Amazing” ideas, it seems, start from simple answers to complex questions. Take the single-use syringe, for example ...continue reading

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Andrew and Akshay - Hacking Health

photo credit: Victor Panlilio

Dr. Akshay Shetty (centre right) is an Internal Medicine Resident at the University of Calgary Dr. Won Hyung A. Ryu (centre left) is a Neurosurgery Resident at the University of Calgary
Dr Aleem Bharwani is Director for the Medical Teaching Unit, Internist, and assistant prof at the University of Calgary

For budding young physicians, it’s almost a rite of passage: you finish your residency, accrue research along the way and then enter the clinical workforce. But a small wrinkle has crept into this tried and tested formula. More than ever, physicians in training are disrupting their medical education to foster innovation and improve the field of health care through non-conventional means, but often at the expense of their own traditional careers. ...continue reading