Tag Archives: podcast

Interview with , pediatric emergency physician and research director at Sainte-Justine hospital in Montreal. In a , Dr. Gravel and colleagues derived and validated a clinical decision rule to identify skull fracture following minor head trauma in young children. The rule should make it possible to identify about 90% of skull fractures in young children with mild head trauma and reduce the use of radiologic investigations by about 60% compared with current practice.

Interview with , Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Renewed interest in the use of psychedelic drugs as treatments for illnesses such as anxiety, addiction and post-traumatic stress disorder has led to small controlled studies. In association with psychotherapy some psychedelic drugs have shown good effects with adequate safety. In an , Dr. Johnson and colleagues look at new emerging evidence.

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Subscribe to CMAJ Podcasts on , , Overcast, Instacast, or your favourite aggregator. You can also follow us directly on our. Our podcasts are also released on  and here on the blogs.

Interview with , Associate Professor of Primary Care with the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Southampton in the UK. In a , Dr. Williamson and colleagues found that nasal balloon autoinflation is a feasible, safe and effective treatment that should be used more often. Having children with chronic otitis media with effusion inflate a balloon device through their nose 3 times a day was more likely than usual care to resolve the effusion and improve ear-related quality of life over 3 months.

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Subscribe to CMAJ Podcasts on , , Overcast, Instacast, or your favourite aggregator. You can also follow us directly on our. Our podcasts are also released on  and here on the blogs.

Practice guidelines recommend that imaging to detect metastases not be performed in the majority of patients with early-stage breast cancer who are asymptomatic. In a published in CMAJ (open access), Dr. Demetrios Simos and colleagues found that, despite these recommendations, most Ontario women with early-stage breast cancer underwent imaging to detect distant metastases. Dr. Matthew Stanbrook, deputy editor for CMAJ, provides an audio summary.

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Subscribe to CMAJ Podcasts on , , Overcast, Instacast, or your favourite aggregator. You can also follow us directly on our. Our podcasts are also released on  and here on the blogs.

First, an interview with , cardiologist at Women’s College Hospital and UHN in Toronto and Director of the Women’s College Hospital Institute for Health System Solutions and Virtual Care. In a (open access), Dr. Bhatia and colleagues found that preoperative ECG and chest radiography were performed more frequently than suggested in guidelines. Using routine health records for 1.5 million people, the authors found considerable variation in rates across institutions, which was not explained by patient- or institution-level factors.

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Dr. John Fletcher, editor-in-chief, gives you highlights of the . In this issue: ultrasound or near-infrared to guide peripheral IV catheterization in children, validation of a 1-hour rule-out rule-in algorithm for myocardial infarction, social media in medical education, global tobacco control, elder abuse, and more.

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Dr. Kirsten Patrick, deputy editor, interviews both , Canada Research Chair in Globalization and Health Equity at the Institute of Population Health and Professor at the University of Ottawa, and , Assistant Professor in the School of Physical and Occupational Therapy at McGill University. In their , published in CMAJ, Labonté and Lencucha propose a pragmatic approach to regulating electronic nicotine delivery systems in Canada: cautious measures similar to tobacco control, while using price incentives to shift tobacco users to electronic devices as a harm reduction mechanism until useful data accumulate on relative health outcomes. ...continue reading

, deputy editor for CMAJ, interviews , Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine at the University of British Columbia and scientist at the Centre for Clinical Epidemiology and Evaluation in Vancouver. Currently, Bill C-17 (Vanessa's Law) does not require health care providers to document serious adverse drug reactions, but mandates that health care institutions report all documented serious reactions. Documentation rates are currently very low and, unless documentation of adverse events improves, the potential of the law to do good will be small, say Hohl and colleagues in (subscription required).

From now until May 25th, Health Canada is .

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Dr. Moneeza Walji, editorial fellow, interviews , nephrologist at London Health Sciences Centre and Professor of Epidemiology and Biostatistics at Western University. Dr. Garg and colleagues found that nitrofurantoin was less effective than other antibiotics for treatment of UTI in a large of older women, regardless of the women’s estimated kidney function. ...continue reading

Highlights from the , presented by Dr. Diane Kelsall, deputy editor.

  • Persistence of meningococcal immunity
  • Heart failure and ejection fraction
  • Pitted keratolysis
  • Canada can afford universal pharmacare
  • Failure to address at-risk drinking
  • Drinking water advisories

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Dr. Moneeza Walji, editorial fellow, interviews , founding and current director of the Centre for Global Health Research in Toronto. In their commentary published in CMAJ, Dr. Jha and colleagues say that slowing tobacco sales in the next decade will depend on strengthening its implementation by increasing excise tax and improving anti-tobacco legislation. ...continue reading